angercontrol

Site Map

About Us
Contact Us

Wednesday, August 20 2014

For professionals & educators

Statistics
Evaluation of Core Value (Compassion) Workshop  course for abusers 285 court-ordered abusers have reached one-year follow-up eligibility (still living with or in continual contact with victim) in Prince George's County. Violence and verbal aggression statistics are from report of victim. Violence is defined as a push, grab, or shove as measured by the Conflict Tactics Scale. Going far beyond anger management to control the resentment that ruins marriage and leads to abuse, graduates of the program, 68% of the total court-ordered sample, are:
  • 86% violence-free (push, grab) after 1 year, based on victim report
  • 71% verbal aggression-free after 1 year, based on victim report
  • 92% free of serious violence (at least one instance of beating up, choking, or threatening with a weapon) after 1 year, based on victim report
On average, group members show:
  • 250% increase in strategies to resolve anger and violent situations***
  • 36% increase in compassion***
  • 49% reduction in anger-hostility***
  • 33% clinical anxiety reduced to normal level***
  • 28% improvement in well-being***
  • 35% improvement in self-esteem**
* = p < .05, 1-tailed; ** = p < .01, 1-tailed; *** = p < .001, 1-tailed; **** = p < .0001, 1-tailed


Data Base of Clients, Prince George’s County, Maryland
  • 99 percentile in physical aggression (CTS, partner report)
  • 97 percentile in verbal aggression (CTS, partner report)
  • 80% non-white (72% African American, 2% Hispanic, 3% Asian, 3% African)
  • Mean age 39
  • income $24,000 (2 standard deviations below average for region)
  • 20% unemployed
  • 76% blue collar
  • 12th grade mean education
  • 36% alcohol problems (13% severe)
  • 8% drug problems w/o alcohol
  • 23% treated for head injuries
  • 2 children on average
  • 32% of enrollees do not complete.

Results of the 1991 pilot experimental testing of the Core Value Workshop on men in five different treatment agencies in Maryland and Virginia, using agency treatment as a comparison. Subjects, randomly assigned to both groups, were in 98 percentile for family violence.

Agency Treatment (24 weeks)
  • 41% (13) violence-free after 1 year, based on victim report****
  • 25% (8) verbal aggression-free after 1 year, based on victim report***
  • 71% (21) reduced violence**
  • 58% (19) reduced verbal aggression**
  • 26% (8) increased violence**
  • 39% (11) increased verbal aggression**
On average, each group member experienced:
  • No significant change from pre-test
  • 48% reduction*
  • No significant change from pre-test
  • No significant change from pre-test
  • No significant change from pre-test
  • 77% improvement***
  • No significant change from pre-test

 

Compassion Workshop (12 weeks)
  • 87% (27) violence-free (push, grab) after 1 year, based on victim report****
  • 71% (22) verbal aggression-free after 1 year, based on victim report***
  • 94% (29) reduced violence**
  • 94% (29) reduced verbal aggression**
  • 0 increased violence**
  • 6% (2) increased verbal aggression**
On average, each group member experienced:
  • 60% clinical anxiety reduced to normal level***
  • 63% reduction in anger-hostility***
  • 30% improvement in well-being***
  • 37% increase in compassion***
  • 8% improvement in self-esteem**
  • 95% improvement in strategies to resolve anger and potentially violent-situations***
  • 65% improvement in acceptance of responsibility for abusive behavior***

* = p < .05, 1-tailed; ** = p < .01, 1-tailed; *** = p < .001, 1-tailed; **** = p < .0001, 1-tailed

For a full report see Treating Attachment Abuse: A Compassionate Approach, by Steven Stosny, published in 1995 by Springer Publishing Co.



Former Victim Data
The following represent changes from pre-test scores of  victims of domestic violence who graduate from the Core Value Workshop.
  • 49% reduction in anxiety * dropping clinical levels of the entire group into normal range.
  • 54% reduction in anger-hostility * dropping distressed levels of entire group into normal range.
  • 21% improvement in well being* raising below normal levels of entire group into high range.
  • 41% improvement in self-esteem* raising slightly below normal levels of entire group into high range.
* = p   < .000, 2-tailed


Aggressive Driving Linked to Family Violence
The Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration analyzed the driving records of 300 persons court-ordered into treatment for family violence violations and found that:
  • 2/3 had multiple aggressive driving violations (M=3.4 for the whole group) the year before domestic violence intervention;
  • Family violence intervention reduced violations by 98% the year following treatment, which was three times better than standard driver improvement intervention. 86% of the same group was free of family violence after one year, based on report of the victim.
Making the Home and the Road Safer at the Same Time
These data suggest that:
  • People who use aggression at home are likely to use it on the road as well.
  • Making other drivers angry on the road can lead to family violence
  • Aggressive driving, unlike careless driving, may require conditioning in impulse-control to regulate
  • Stricter enforcement of traffic laws with impulse-control intervention as a consequence of violations may prevent family violence.